HOME STALLIONS HOW TO FIND US CONTACT US Jack Hobbs Ardad
 

STALLIONS

OUR TERMS

DUNADEN PREMIUMS!

SERVICES

HISTORY

HOW TO FIND US

SENDING A MARE?

ABOUT US

LATEST NEWS

What a weekend!

Fast Company records first Classic winner with Jet Setting 24 hours after G2 victory for Devonshire

Fast Company was the toast of the Curragh this weekend when his daughter Jet Setting valiantly fought off long odds-on favourite Minding to win the Tattersalls Irish 1,000 Guineas for rookie trainer Adrian Keatley and the Equine Growth Partners Syndicate.

Winless during her juvenile season, Jet Setting did however show promise, twice finishing runner-up last spring before going on to finish third to subsequent Poule d’Essai des Pouliches winner La Cressonniere in the Listed Prix Herod last November, just a month after being bought at Tattersalls’ Horses-in-Training sale for 12,000gns.

The daughter of the Johannesburg mare Mean Lae, who was bred in Ireland by Paddy Kelly, has continued to build on that performance this year, winning her maiden in March before landing the G3 Lepardstown 1,000 Guineas Trial, beating Now Or Never.

Her sporting connections supplemented her for both the English and Irish 1,000 Guineas and she posted a game run in ninth behind Minding at Newmarket, where the drying ground had gone against her.

Returning to more favourable conditions in Ireland, Jet Setting roared to the front of the field at the Curragh with three furlongs to run and, despite being headed by Minding in the closing stages, battled on strongly to regain the upper hand and win by a head.

Her victory came less than 24 hours after last year’s Irish 1,000 Guineas third, Devonshire, landed the G2 Lanwades Stud Stakes on the opening day of the Irish Guineas meeting for Willie McCreery and Godolphin. The four-year-old filly has now won three times, including the Listed Listowel Stakes last September.

She followed on from the first-race victory by another of Fast Company’s offspring, Downforce, who is also trained by McCreery and won the six-furlong BAM Handicap.